Melania Trump Club

Sunday, April 15, 2012

MUSICIAN who has made a career out of fine-tuning rubbish is playing a key role in Weymouth and Portland’s Olympic Torch Relay evening celebrations. But James Kimber is appealing for help from the public and local businesses to help a mass drumming event go with a bang. He needs ‘a few hundred’ plastic barrels and containers, such as empty catering-sized mayonnaise tubs, to be used as makeshift drums by schoolchildren during the Moving Tides children’s procession. Six hundred youngsters will be heralding the start of Weymouth’s official London 2012 Olympic Torch Relay evening celebrations on Thursday, July 12 – one of just 66 places across the county chosen to host events during the 70-day relay. Mr Lowden said: "I felt very proud to be the holder of this thing." The torch was about 2ft (60cm) high with a crown at the top. It was engraved with the runner's name and the name of his running club. "I don't remember it being heavy at all," he said. "There were lots of people cheering me on, girls blew kisses at me. "The streets were lined with people. You don't really pay much attention, but you know they are there. Mr Lowdon says he was very proud to carry the Olympic torch in 1948 "You have to think about the thing in mind, that you're running a race." His advice for those taking part in the 2012 Olympic torch relay is to go at a "good running pace" and hold the torch at shoulder height. "Just appear proud of carrying it," he said. The London 2012 Olympic Torch is made from an aluminium alloy, and features 8,000 circles representing the 8,000 people who will carry it around the UK. The 70-day relay begins at Land's End, Cornwall, on 19 May and concludes during the Olympic opening ceremony in London on 27 July. London 2012 organisers Locog say the torch will cover about 8,000 miles and come within 10 miles of 95% of the population.


Miami Heat guard Dwyane Wade believes players should be paid for playing for the United States at the Olympics.
The 30-year-old was echoing sentiments expressed by Boston Celtics guard Ray Allen on Tuesday.
'It's a lot of things you do for the Olympics - a lot of jerseys you sell,' Wade was quoted as saying on espn.com.
'We play the whole summer. I do think guys should be compensated.'


Wade, who was the leading scorer as the Americans claimed gold in Beijing in 2008, is worried about the amount of rest players will get with the London Games taking up most of their off-season.


'The biggest thing is now you get no rest,' Wade said. 'So you go to the end of the season, training camp is two weeks later.
'You're giving up a lot to do it. It's something you want to do. But it's taxing on your body.
'You're not playing for the dollar, but it would be nice if you would get compensated.'


The 30-year-old was echoing sentiments expressed by Boston Celtics guard Ray Allen on Tuesday.
"It's a lot of things you do for the Olympics – a lot of jerseys you sell," Wade was quoted as saying on espn.com.
"We play the whole summer. I do think guys should be compensated."
Wade, who was the leading scorer as the Americans claimed gold in Beijing in 2008, is worried about the amount of rest players will get with the London Games taking up most of their off-season.


"The biggest thing is now you get no rest," Wade said. "So you go to the end of the season, training camp is two weeks later.

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